Global Studies Day: March 3

NOTE: All Global Studies Day events will take place at Augsburg College and the University of Minnesota West Bank campus.

8:00 – 9:00 A.M.              Registration (Ted Mann Concert Hall)

9:00 – 9:15 A.M.              Opening Session (Ted Mann Concert Hall)
                                      
Lois Quam, Global Health Initiative, with greetings from Secretary Hillary
                                       Clinton

9:15 – 10:15 A.M.            Keynote Speaker: F.W. de Klerk, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate
                                      Making the Right Decisions in an Unpredictable World

10:15 – 10:45 A.M.          Networking Break

10:45 – 12:00 P.M.          Morning Workshop Sessions (Augsburg College)

Creating the Rainbow Nation: Who Wins the Prize?
Robert Jones (University of Minnesota), Marie Strom (IDASA), Naomi Tutu (Nozizwe Consulting), Dr. Leon Rodrigues (Bethel University), Rev. Terrance Jacob (ELCA Pastor)
The joint award of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993 to Frederik de Klerk and Nelson Mandela recognised the complexities of South Africa’s path to peace, and the role of both leaders in bringing to an end the apartheid regime. The joint award was not without controversy, and this panel will explore some of the challenges of creating the rainbow nation. More broadly, the panel will reflect on the difficulties of weaving together multiple narratives in the ongoing work of nation-building in post-apartheid South Africa.

Peace Through Health: Building bridges between Israelis and Palestinians through Public Health Collaboration
David Hilden, Hennepin County Medical Center
Given the seemingly overwhelming challenges to peace between Israelis and Palestinians, areas of common interest are often hard to identify. Health care is one such area where both peoples may have similar motivations and as such, health care education can be used to develop collaborative relationships between these traditionally adversarial groups in the Middle East. This workshop will include presentations and panel discussions exploring the common human need for healthy lives as one way to foster peace in a troubled land.

A Peace of My Mind: Exploring the Meaning of Peace One Story at a Time
John Noltner & Heatherlyn
Explore the meaning of peace through real-world examples of those who are working toward peace in large and small ways in their communities and the larger world. Participants will explore the stories in A Peace of My Mind, and then use those stories to guide their own conversations about how we can have an impact on the world around us. Together we will see that we all face daily choices about how we respond to one another and the world around us…and the way we choose to respond to those choices can move us toward a more peaceful world.

Trade Brings Peace
John L. Graham, University of California Irvine Merage School of Business
It’s an axiom of international relations that trade between countries delivers peace through mutual interdependence and understanding. This fundamental truth is easy to forget when the conversation turns to notions such as “blood for oil,” the global trade in weapons, and the exploitation free enterprise often allows or even promotes. The focus of this workshop will be how commerce can continue bringing peace to some of the tough spots around the world today and long into the future.

The Price of Peace in the Horn Of Africa
LaJune Thomas Lange, Retired; President International Leadership Institute, Nadifa Osman, Executive Director WARDA
The Republic of Kenya erupted in civil conflict in 2007 following a dispute over the results of the Presidential election. With the help of the international community Kenya was able to pull back from a conflict which left scars of devestation across the country in less than 60 days and form a coalition government. The workshop will examine the devestation and rebuilding of Eldoret.Kenya and the indictments by the International Criminal Court.
 

The Price of Peace and the Costs of War: How War and Wall Street Hi-jack Our Future and What We Can Do about it.
Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer, University of St. Thomas

This workshop will examine links between U.S. economic and social decline, Wall Street profiteering, the distorted priorities of the Military Industrial Complex, and the erosion of democracy. It will also examine the emergence of social movements (including Occupy Wall Street, 350.org, Move to Amend, and the Minnesota Arms Spending Alternatives Project) that are forging solutions, including building a culture and economy of peace.

Angham al-Salaam / Melodies of Peace: Uniting Israel and Palestine Through Music
Vanessa Cornett-Murtada & Salam Murtada, University of St. Thomas
This interactive workshop will facilitate discussion, foster creative thinking, and present new ideas about the use of music to build peace in the Middle East. Our goals are to create dialogue and find a common ground between the people of Israel and Palestine, to use native folk tunes in new musical compositions, and to engage people in the peace process at a young age to counteract potential negative cultural conditioning. Participants should come prepared to listen to and participate in music for peace, and to brainstorm ways in which we can build global understanding between conflicting nations and cultures in the twenty-first century.

Can Reconciliation Be Taught?
Steinar Bryn, Nansen Center for Peace and Dialogue
Steinar Bryn has worked with dialog and reconciliation in some of the most war-torn areas of Europe since WWII. His work is illustrated in the film Reunion shown at today’s 12:30 Concurrent Session. In this workshop he will discuss the possibility of teaching reconciliation and answer questions about the film. He has facilitated more than 200 dialog-seminars.

Post-War Japan: The Creation of a New Identity from Ground Zero Up
Mark Tiedeman, Nagasaki University of Foreign Studies
In the quiet chaos of post-war Japanese society, the destroyed cities teemed with millions of widows and orphans and veterans turned labor/socialist activists. With their world vision shattered and replaced overnight by an American Vision, the Japanese people reinvented themselves as a constructive, family-oriented, liberal, democratic, capitalistic people, all without loosing their soul identity as Japanese. What lessons does this hold for other post-conflict countries?

Norway as a Peace Nation: Peace Scholars Reflect on Summer 2011
Peace Scholars, Augsburg, Augustana, Concordia, Luther and St. Olaf Colleges
The 2011 Peace Scholars will share their experiences and insights from a summer studying peace issues in Oslo, Norway. The students will discuss the time they spent in a dialogue session at the Nansen Dialogue Network, taking courses at the International Summer School, and visiting peace organizations throughout Norway. They will also reflect on the July 22nd attacks in Oslo and what we can learn from the “Price of Peace” that Norway pays for being a peace nation.

Illustrating the Cost of War: Artists Respond to a Decade of Conflict
Camille Gage & Susanne Slavick, University of Minnesota and Carnegie Mellon University, with guest artists Sundus Abdul Hadi, Tamara Abdul Hadi, and Dena Al-Adeeb
This workshop introduces work of artists around the world who bear witness to the costs of war: human, economic, spiritual. Witnessing these acts and their aftermath directly or indirectly, artists wrestle with the ability to comprehend and convey them.  With an international perspective, these artists envision the impact of war across generations, its terrible residue, cataclysmic loss and calculated enactment. They examine what rains down in destruction and what rises from the ashes, what painfully lingers and what we long for instead. The workshop begins with Out of Rubble, a presentation by Susanne Slavick. During the second half of the workshop, Camille Gage moderates a conversation with Slavick and Iraqi artists Sundus Abdul Hadi, Tamara Abdul Hadi, and Dena Al-Adeeb.

Religion and Politics in the Egyptian Spring: the Emerging Role of Women
Shaymaa Reyad, Humphrey International Fellowship Program
The growing salience of religion today is deepening the political significance of religious freedom as a universal human right and a source of social and political stability. Hence, focusing on a religious perspective to define the ethical and political leadership during the Egyptian revolution is a crucial to understanding how the revolution has succeeded. Many stories demonstrate how peace is very difficult to achieve without faith and belief. This workshop will share those stories as a price of peace. 

The Psychological and Neurobiological Price of Peace: Unpacking the Relationship of Trauma and Revenge
Donna Minter, Minnesota Peacebuilding Leadership Institute
This interactive workshop will introduce participants to the neurobiological and psychological price of peace by exploring the relationships and consequences of trauma, revenge, and life-promoting peacebuilding alternatives from spirituality/faith traditions, restorative justice, conflict transformation, active nonviolence, and resilience. Cultural and racial issues will be addressed. Participants will also learn practical strategies for rendering psychological first aid to minimize psychological trauma during times of crisis.

Palestinians and Israelis in Restorative Dialogue: Engaging the Energy of Compassion and Forgiveness
Mark Umbreit, New York University
This workshop focuses on the story of bereaved Palestinian and Israeli family members supporting each other and speaking out to end the violence and build peace. Dr. Umbreit shares his work with the Parents Circle/Family Forum over the past six years. He will report on his recent trip to Israel and Palestine during which he again met with the Parents Circle and other joint Israeli/Palestinian NGOs engaged in peacebuilding initiatives.

Paigaam: Spreading the Message, One Peace at a Time in Kashmir, Pakistan, East Timor and other Conflicted Regions of the World.
Ufra Mir, Luther College                                                                          What started as Ufra Mir’s health-peace initiative for youth in Kashmir (India), has evolved as a growing international peace nonprofit organization today called Paigaam: a Message for Peace. Paigaam works to educate, train and empower youth, children, and adults in the values, principles, and best practices of various intercultural peacebuilding. Currently, Paigaam offers peace-education training workshops to Luther and Decorah communities along with supporting and promoting Music for Peace Initiative in East-Timor. Paigaam has also started a cross-cultural Art for Peace Initiative for children affected by conflict and violence in Pakistan, Indian-Kashmir, USA, Canada and East-Timor.

Religion in South Africa: A Force for Peace or Conflict?
Guy Nave, Luther College
In South Africa and elsewhere, religion is a powerful force. Religious institutions and beliefs played strong roles in the perpetuation of and emergence from apartheid in South Africa. What can other parts of the world learn from South Africa’s religious expression and practice?

The Price of Imperfect Peace: Working with South African Kids to Build Dignity and Hope
Martin Klammer, Luther College
Economic distress, drugs and random violence are facts of life for disadvantaged youth in Cape Town. This workshop explores the causes of the injustice and a collegiate program that brings dignity and hope to these kids in a youth summer camp.

Special Showing of the film Reunion: 10 Years After the War
This Amanda Award winning film documents the emotional journey of Albanian and Serb students who confronted each other, their fears, and their conflicts before the bombs fell in Kosovo in 1999. Ten years later they reunited under the guidance of the Nansen Peace Center and Steinar Bryn. This powerful conversation captured on film is a testimony to conflict resolution in progress.

The Price of Peace and the Role of Leadership
Joe Cavanaugh, Youth Frontiers
For nearly 30 years, Joe Cavanaugh, Founder & CEO of Youth Frontiers, Inc., has worked with schools to build the character of young people. Our next generation of leaders in teaching, public service or business will shoulder enormous responsibility. How do we help these young people embrace respect, humility, temperance, and moral courage? What is the price that will be paid if we are successful — or if we are not?

Imagine Better: The End of Empires?
Andrew Slack, The Harry Potter Alliance
When we think about improving the world, what holds us back? How can we unleash our imaginations in a more productive way? Might the concept of empires yield to a different reality, one with more hope and more potential?

Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping
Mel Duncan, Nonviolent Peace Force
Well-trained unarmed civilian peacekeepers are protecting civilians and preventing violence in some of the most violent hot spots in the world today. Stability and security are the sine qua non for development and business. How does this emerging peacekeeping practice that creates a firm foundation for a sustainable peace to flourish?

12:00 – 12:30 P.M.          Lunch Break

12:30 – 1:45 P.M.           Concurrent Sessions (Augsburg College)

Controversial Nobel Peace Prizes: Successes or Failures?
Geir Lundestad

Through the years, Nobel Peace Prize awards have often been controversial. What does this controversy teach us and what does the lens of history lend?

Science: A Tool of Diplomacy
Peter Agre, Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Bloomberg School of Public Health
Unconstrained by political limitations and welcomed around the world, scientists are undertaking behind-the-scenes efforts to foster humanitarian objectives that are not possible for politicians and government leaders. Hear what this 2003 Nobel Chemistry Prize winner has learned about how scientists view their work in advancing world stability, and what price they pay for the privilege of doing this.

Special Showing of the film Reunion: 10 Years After the War
This Amanda Award winning film documents the emotional journey of Albanian and Serb students who confronted each other, their fears, and their conflicts before the bombs fell in Kosovo in 1999. Ten years later they reunited under the guidance of the Nansen Peace Center and Steinar Bryn. This powerful conversation captured on film is a testimony to conflict resolution in progress.

Peace: The Inside Story
Abdul Aziz Said, Mohammed Said Farsi Chair of Islamic Peace, American University
Peace includes ecological balance, human dignity, political pluralism, and cultural diversity. The power of peace consists of the human spirit and love.

1:45 – 2:15 P.M.             Networking Break

2:15 – 3:30 P.M.             Afternoon Workshop Sessions (Augsburg College)

Creating the Rainbow Nation: Who Wins the Prize? (same as morning session)

Peace Through Health: Building bridges between Israelis and Palestinians through Public Health Collaboration (same as morning session)

A Peace of My Mind: Exploring the Meaning of Peace One Story at a Time (same as morning session) 

Business Innovators as Pillars of Peace
Robert Sicina
Business innovation creates economic opportunity as a pillar of the stabilization and peace processes. This workshop presents a project in which business students developed business plans for projects in Tunisia and Jordan. Then it focuses on two programs examining the role of multinational corporation executives doing economic development projects in difficult locations. Finally it presents a new line of thinking that fuses competitiveness and innovation with sustainability and social justice that can bring about greatest long-term results.

Special Showing of the film Reunion: 10 Years After the War
This Amanda Award winning film documents the emotional journey of Albanian and Serb students who confronted each other, their fears, and their conflicts before the bombs fell in Kosovo in 1999. Ten years later they reunited under the guidance of the Nansen Peace Center and Steinar Bryn. This powerful conversation captured on film is a testimony to conflict resolution in progress.

Imagine Better: The End of Empires? (same as morning session)

The Price of Peace in the Horn Of Africa (same as morning session)

The Price of Peace and the Costs of War: How War and Wall Street Hi-jack Our Future and What We Can Do about it. (same as morning session)

Angham al-Salaam / Melodies of Peace: Uniting Israel and Palestine Through Music (same as morning session)

Can Reconciliation Be Taught? (same as morning session)

Post-War Japan: The Creation of a New Identity from Ground Zero Up (same as morning session)

Norway as a Peace Nation: Peace Scholars Reflect on Summer 2011 (same as morning session)

Religion and Politics in the Egyptian Spring: the Emerging Role of Women (same as morning session)

The Psychological and Neurobiological Price of Peace: Unpacking the Relationship of Trauma and Revenge (same as morning session)

Religion in South Africa: A Force for Peace or Conflict? (same as morning session)

Art in Syrian Revolution
Fadia Afashe
Why is art such an obvious part of the Arab Spring, especially the Syrian Revolution? What is the artist’s attitude toward the revolution, how does that affect the revolution itself, and what new art has appeared in Syria as a result of the revolution? This workshop will also explore the effects of the new technology and the creativity of young people in Syria.

Davis Projects for Peace: Challenges and Opportunities of College Student Involvement in Peace Initiatives
Michael Manansala & Cecelia Martinez-Miranda

In this workshop, we examine the Davis 100 Projects for Peace and tease out the challenges and opportunities college students face when engaging in development and peace projects. We draw from our experience with Projects for Peace in the Philippines as examples from other projects implemented in the past.

How Humanitarian Response in Libya Influences Peace and Stability in the Region
Jamal Tarhuni & Joe DiCarlo

Medical Teams International (MTI) is one of the first international humanitarian organizations that landed in Libya when the uprising started, sending medical supplies and volunteer medical teams to help the victims wounded in the recent crisis. While the humanitarian assistance offered in Libya is apolitical in nature, it happens in a political context. The workshop will talk about MTI’s humanitarian response in Libya, how it works in close collaboration with Libyans in the U.S. and Libya, and with the Transitional National Council to respond to the Libyan people’s needs.Business Choices: Supporting the Peace or War Economy?

Imagine Better: the End of Empires? (same as morning session)

Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping (same as morning session)Business Choices:

Aung San Suu Kyi and the New Political Era
Ingrid Jordt, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
A new moment is occurring, as the global awakening of democratic rights now encompasses South East Asia. Myanmar (Burma) stands at a new crossroads, as Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi has been granted the opportunity to run for elected office. What does this awakening mean for the people, for business, and for political alliances in the region? Prof Ingrid Jordt, recently returned from Myanmar where she met with the Nobel Laureate, shares her insights

3:30 – 4:00 P.M.             Networking Break

4:00 – 5:30 P.M.            Nobel Peace Prize Forum Closing Ceremony (Ted Mann)

Video Address: Aung San Suu Kyi, 1991 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate

The Price of Peace: We Are All Called to Pay
Naomi Tutu

Call to Action address

 

“Across a Border” by Jocelyn Hagen
Kristi Stanichar, oboe
Debra Reid, piano
Commissioned for the Augustana Choir’s participation in the Peace Prize Forum 2012 as an offering in honor of the Novel Peace Prize Laureates and all who work for and have paid the price of peace.